Category Archives: Children with Disabilities

Pakistan: Unsafe drinking water causes disability among children worldwide

9 April 2014 KARACHI:

Toxically germ-infested unsafe drinking water is causing different form of disability among children globally, mainly caused by teratogens. 

The excessive use of medication and consuming polluted water results in the development of abnormal cell tissue in unborn as well as newly born babies particularly during foetal growth, yielding a multiplex of physiochemical defects in the foetus. Improper and untreated disposal of sanitary water and untreated industrial waste is resulting in contamination of sub soil water threatening the nature. 

Principal Investigators of South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) Sector’s Academic Alliance for Subsoil Water Toxicity Research Initiative Prof Qadhi Aurangzeb Al Hafi and Pro-Vice Chancellor of Dow University of Health Sciences (DUHS) Prof M Umar Farooq were of the view this was the first time Pakistani researchers’ study has been recognised at United Nations (UN) and Pakistan takes the historic edge of launching the first ever model of Terato-kinetc Research in the recorded history of medical sciences.The groundbreaking research document has been primed for over 1,700 international esteemed universities of the globe, in accordance with the UN mandates and conventions on the subject. 

The first categorical research model was demonstrated at Higher Education Commission (HEC) Pakistan in continuum of the multi academia polygonal scientific colloquia the UN ‘International Observance Day for Disability’, at Dow University of Health Sciences Karachi followed by its academic sessions and scientific symposia at Punjab University and Higher Education Commission of Pakistan. The multi-academic colloquia consist of 9 scientific orientations, 17 confluences, 10 symposia and 19 demonstrations worldwide. 

[Courtesy of Daily Time]

Advertisements

Somalia: Polio Outbreak Thwarts Global Eradication Effort

The global community came tantalizingly close earlier this year to ridding the world of polio. But then in May, the eradication effort took a powerful blow. The virus turned up again in the Horn of Africa, first in Somalia.

The Banadir region of Somalia, which includes a Mogadishu refugee camp, is thought to be the so-called “engine” of the Horn of Africa polio outbreak.

In June, three-year-old Mohamed Naasir became ill. His mother, Khadija Abdullahi Adam, said soon after one leg became permanently disabled.

“My son was fine, but he started having a high fever which lasted for almost four days,” she explained. “I gave him medicine, but there was no change. The following morning he said to me ‘Mom, I can’t stand up.'”

The virus has spread at a rapid pace, triggering massive vaccination efforts.

Earlier in 2013, polio was confined to three so-called “endemic countries” — Nigeria, Afghanistan and Pakistan — where the virus has never been snuffed out. Combined there were fewer than 100 cases in those three countries.

Since the virus re-emerged in the Horn of Africa, there have been at least 160 polio cases in Somalia alone, and the virus has spread to Kenya and Ethiopia.

Continue reading

Children with Disabilities Report launched by UNICEF

Download  - Download the report30 May 2013

Entitled Children with Disabilities, the report examines the discrimination and deprivations that these children  Children with Disabilities and their families confront. It describes the progress that is being made, albeit unevenly, in ensuring that children with disabilities have the fair access to services and opportunities that is their right. And it urges governments, their international partners, civil society, and employers to take concrete steps to advance the cause of inclusion – as a matter of equity and for the benefit of all.

In order to achieve this goal, international agencies and donors and their national and local partners should include children with disabilities in the objectives, targets and monitoring indicators of all development programmes.

Exclusion is often the consequence of invisibility. Few countries have reliable information on how many of their citizens are children with disabilities, what disabilities they have or how these disabilities affect their lives. As a result, few are capable of knowing what types and amounts of support these children and their families need – much less how best to respond. One of the report’s chapters is therefore devoted to exploring challenges, progress and opportunities in the area of data collection and analysis.

The report also contains a series of personal essays by young people with disabilities and some of the people who work with children and adolescents with disabilities – among them, parents, caregivers and advocates.

It is our hope that this report will inform the dialogue and nurture the action that is necessary to create a world in which children with disabilities enjoy their rights on a par with other children, even in the most remote settings and the most deprived circumstances.

[Courtesy of UNICEF]